Meditation on Silence

The word silence connotes a stillness, quiet, peace, or fear.

Have you known a period of silence when the darkness descended like a cloak, the earth became iron, the heavens a steel vault, no answer given to anguished cries. When the darkness descends, time ceases, the abyss of pain encloses one in its grip in utter aloneness. God seems to be uncaring, indifferent.

Then the darkness passes, the light enters. The cloud lifts, and we rejoice with joy unutterable in the depths of our soul. And there is a change in us, an awareness of forces unknown, forces of God working for our good.

My friend, why does God place us in the darkness? Is it not that He is teaching us to let go of self. We dimly grasp the way He leads us through the valley for His good purpose. In the times of our great helplessness, He is shaping us into a unique vessel for His glory. Our destiny is far out in some other age where we are to be ambassadors for the Grace and Mercy of God. Count it blessed to be so honored by our God as he works to shape us in the image of His son.

What is the Church?

Lessons from G. Campbell Morgan who served in the Westminster Chapel of London.

The Church of God is the depository of the treasures of God for the race. It is the instrument through which God reaches men/women for their salvation.
The only use God has for His people in the world is that through them people may be won and brought into the fold of the Church.
We, the Church, bear the vessels of the Lord, men and women who share the life of Christ and walk in His light.
“Be ye clean ye that bear the vessels of the Lord,” Isaiah 52:11, said.
The word clean as used by Isaiah means clarified with burning heat. Be ye of that fire nature in which no impure  thing can live.
This is the Church which God can use to bear witness for His Son to the world. The day of Grace is today, and all who will may come to Him to be purified in the fire of His Love.
May His followers be clean vessels for His use in the world.

A Poem

God’s Word

I paused last eve beside a blacksmith’s door,
And heard the anvil ring, the vesper’s chime,
And looking in I saw upon the floor
Old hammers, worn with beating years of time.
“How many anvils have you had?” said I
“To wear and batter all these hammers so?”
“Just one,” he answered. Then with twinkling eye:
“The anvil wears the hammers out, you know.”
And so, I thought, the anvils of God’s Word
For ages skeptic’s blows have beat upon,
But though the noise of falling blows was heard
The anvil is unchanged; the hammers gone.

-John Clifford

Thoughts on a just society.

My book The Boy Who Walked A Way is a comment on the world we live in and the world we would like it to be. Throughout history runs the theme of man’s struggle to realize a world wherein the fruits of his labors will bring about a just and peaceful world. By these means, through his struggle, humankind will at last enter into a destined peaceable state. Whether it is the utopia of socialism (communism) or the utopia of capitalism the goal is to create a society wherein the individual can realize  her/his potential.
Humanism is a composite of both philosophies. Focused on the world without the  need for a divine entity  humanism seeks to bring into being a just and honorable system.
Once the goals are attained,however,the struggle for the good morphs into a struggle for power. (Clearly seen in communism). The will to power is a villain shrewd and destructive. Leaders in authority seldom relinquish power for the good freely.
So are we to conclude that the yearning for a just and honorable world is at fault. By no means. It is God’s imprint in us. The fault lies in man’s attempt to create a system without God. All systems would work if He is at the center and none will work if He is dismissed as superfluous.
Christ has commissioned His followers who are joined to the Kingdom to labor and pray for its realization on earth.
May all who love Him be obedient to His command.

Comments on G. Campbell ‘s sermon on Fellowship with God

G. Campbell Morgan spoke of George Mathieson’s description of gentleness. When we speak of a brook running down the hill side as a gentle brook, we are using a false term. There is no gentleness in the brook, but if we watch the mighty ocean when it kisses the golden sands and does not harm the child at play, then we may speak of gentleness. Gentleness is strength held in reserve and placed at the service of weakness-“Thy gentleness hath made me great.” 2 Sam 22:36
When we question why God does not move more quickly to accomplish His purpose in the world, to put an end to all that frets and puzzles us, remember His long suffering patience. His time is not our time. From His creation of the world to the present is a span of minutes in His reckoning of time. He moves slowly to perfect His plans for this earth and His children. His gentleness like the mighty ocean’s is held in reserve and placed at the service of our weakness.

He Knows

When I was very young I loved the 1800’s poets and still do.
This poem is a great comfort for those who grieve
and I have known grief.

I cannot see His skies, above,
For Autumn mists obscure the west;
But in the shelter of His love,
I fain would hush my heart to rest;
Though some bright hopes have tenderly
Been gathered to their last repose,
This sweet remembrance comforts me—
He knows.

For why the summer came —and went
He shows not yet to me, His child;
But patience , richer than content,
Broods softly where the summer smiled;
And where the last bright leaf shall fall,
The last pale blossom find repose,
Is safe with Him Who loveth all—
He knows.

Amid the hush of finished things
He hears His children’s feeblest prayer,
The tender shadowing of His wings
Extends beyond their utmost care;
And loss that ne’er on earth grows less.
With deep and holy meaning glows,
Since loss and pain, and homelessness—
He knows.

I cannot tell if cross or crown
Lies next within His thought for me;
It matters not, since faith has grown
So strong in His dear sympathy;
The clouds that o’er my pathway move,
The joys beyond its final close,
All rise from His deep heart of love—
He knows.

Late 1800’s Unknown poet.

Comments on G. Campbell Morgan’s sermon: Fellowship with God

G. Campbell Morgan spoke of George Mathieson’s description of gentleness. ‘When we speak of a brook running down the hill side as a gentle brook, we are using a false term. There is no gentleness in the brook but if we watch the mighty ocean when it kisses the golden sands and does not harm the child at play, then we may speak of gentleness. Gentleness is strength held in reserve and placed at the service of weakness-“Thy gentleness hath made me great.” 2 Sam 22:36′
When we question why God does not move more quickly to accomplish His purpose in the world, to put an end to all that frets and puzzles us, remember His long suffering patience. His time is not our time. From His creation of the world to the present is a span of minutes in His reckoning of time. He moves slowly to perfect His plans for this earth and His children. His gentleness like the mighty ocean’s is held in reserve and placed at the service of our weakness.

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